Use this page to view archived advisories. The table below shows the overall danger rating and the bottom line for the 20 most recent advisories. Click on the time and date link above each danger rating icon to view the full advisory for that day. Use the date chooser or the pager at the bottom to scroll through the older advisories.

E.g., 09/24/2017
E.g., 09/24/2017
Date the advisory was published: Bottom Line
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March 27, 2017 at 6:50 am

The avalanche danger is MODERATE near treeline and above treeline.  Wind slabs exist in leeward terrain, primarily on S-SE-E-NE-N aspects. Precipitation will taper off by the early afternoon, but steady, westerly winds will continue. Watch for blowing snow and fresh wind slab development throughout the day. The avalanche danger is LOW below treeline.      

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March 26, 2017 at 6:06 am

LOW danger this morning will rise to MODERATE with brief windows of CONSIDERABLE avalanche danger today. New wind slabs are possible near and above treeline due to gusty west/southwest winds and fresh snow. Pay attention to areas where blowing snow is observed. Evaluate the snow carefully and identify features of concern.

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March 25, 2017 at 6:21 am

Above 6,500 feet, a foot of new snow over the past 36 hours accompanied by strong westerly winds has contributed to several avalanche problems for today. Human triggered avalanches are possible. Expect overall MODERATE avalanche danger for most aspects and elevations with CONSIDERABLE danger on leeward, NE-E-SE aspects above treeline. Slopes greater than 35 degrees should be approached with caution. Be able to make solid snow observations and don't ignore obvious signs of avalanche danger!

 

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March 24, 2017 at 6:37 am

Wind slab avalanches will be likely for human trigger today above treeline due to new snow and windy conditions. Expect CONSIDERABLE danger above treeline in exposed areas, along ridgelines and near the edges of open bowls. Some isolated, exposed areas near treeline could experience CONSIDERABLE danger as well, however near treeline MODERATE danger will prevail overall. Below treeline, avalanche danger is LOW. 

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March 23, 2017 at 6:45 am

Avalanche danger is CONSIDERABLE above treeline, MODERATE near treeline, and LOW below treeline. Up to 17 inches of snow was received during the storms beginning on Monday afternoon. Above 8000' wind slabs exist and will continue to be loaded with blowing snow and new snow tonight. When venturing into terrain that is steeper than 30 degrees, pay attention. Avalanches are possible and likely on slopes covered with snow transported by the wind. 

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March 22, 2017 at 7:45 am

Avalanche danger is CONSIDERABLE near and above treeline.  With 11 inches of new snow and poor bonding between the new snow and an underlying crust, wind slabs on leeward slopes will be sensitive to human trigger. With 4 inches of additional snow today and continued wind transport, natural avalanches are possible. Watch out for sloughing snow as well. Though less likely, isolated slabs could be encountered below treeline on slopes greater than 35 degrees. Below treeline, avalanche danger is MODERATE.

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March 21, 2017 at 6:46 am

The avalanche danger is CONSIDERABLE above treeline and MODERATE near treeline.  New snow and strong southeast winds have allowed wind slabs to form in lee areas near and above treeline, with the most dangerous conditions in alpine terrain above 9000ft.  Snowfall will continue as freezing levels lower, and backcountry travelers should carefully evaluate changing conditions throughout the day.  LOW avalanche danger exists below treeline.     

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March 20, 2017 at 6:21 am

The avalanche danger is MODERATE on all aspects above treeline. Variable winds have redistributed the recent snow in the alpine, creating fresh wind slabs on lee slopes and terrain features, primarily above 9000ft. LOW avalanche danger exists near treeline and below treeline.

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March 19, 2017 at 6:39 am

MODERATE danger exists above treeline on all aspects.  New snow over the past 24 hours paired with strong and variable winds has formed fresh wind slabs in leeward terrain features, primarily above 9000ft.  The avalanche danger near treeline and below treeline is LOW.

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March 18, 2017 at 6:31 am

LOW danger this morning may increase to MODERATE danger later today. Strong southwest to northwest winds and new snow will contribute to fresh wind slab formation above treeline. This problem will be confined to primarily the upper slopes of Mt Shasta, above 9,000 feet. Below and near treeline, the avalanche danger will remain LOW.

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March 17, 2017 at 5:56 am

LOW avalanche danger will preside over all elevations and aspects within the forecast area today.

Normal caution is advised.

Climbers, watch for falling rime ice as well as smooth and firm snow conditions on the upper mountain. Self-arrest is essential. Carry an ice axe and crampons and know how to use them. Wear a helmet. 

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March 16, 2017 at 6:45 am

Avalanche danger above 9000 feet is MODERATE due to the potential for wind slab avalanches. Avoid wind loaded slopes greater than 30 degrees. Below treeline, expect a wet heavy snowpack that could lead to loose wet slides. Below and at treeline, the avalanche danger is LOW. LOW means unlikely, but not impossible, so stay vigilant if you are sinking beyond your boot cuffs. You may be near loose wet avalanche terrain.

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March 15, 2017 at 6:45 am

LOW avalanche danger exists on all aspects and at all elevations.  This may increase to MODERATE above treeline late in the day as the 2-4 inches of expected snow combine with strong SW winds to create wind slabs. Above 9000', pay attention to where the wind is blowing snow. Avoid leewards aspects greater than 30 degrees. With no overnight freeze and the addition of rain to the snowpack, wet loose avalanches could still pose a problem near and below treeline.

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March 14, 2017 at 6:35 am

LOW avalanche danger exists on all aspects and at all elevations.  As snow surfaces warm up throughout the day, wet loose avalanches may pose a concern for backcountry travelers on E-SE-S-SW-W aspects near and below treeline.  Also, falling rime ice presents a significant hazard for anyone venturing high in the alpine on Mount Shasta today.

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March 13, 2017 at 7:02 am

The avalanche danger is LOW on all aspects and at all elevations.  Loose wet avalanches remain the primary concern.  The likelihood of triggering an avalanche will increase throughout the day as snow surfaces melt and become unconsolidated.  Falling rime ice presents a significant objective hazard as well.  Watch for falling ice in the alpine, and also for its potential to trigger wet loose slides on slopes below. 

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March 12, 2017 at 7:02 am

LOW avalanche danger exists this morning. Later today, an overall cloudless sky with daytime highs 3 to 5 degrees warmer than yesterday will contribute to rising avalanche danger.  Slopes E-SE-S-SW-W facing near treeline and below treeline could see small to medium size loose wet point releases. Most of these will be triggered by falling rime ice and/or backcountry riders. For these reasons, expect MODERATE loose wet avalanche danger this afternoon due to intense daytime warming and direct sunshine.

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March 11, 2017 at 4:19 am

Prolonged above-freezing temperatures over the last two days means loose-wet avalanches are possible today. Avalanche danger is MODERATE below, at, and above treeline. Elevations above 10,000 feet that have been subjected to cooler temperatures are less likely to see this problem. Long, steep slopes provide the potential for loose wet avalanches to gain significant size and entrain enough snow to bury a person. Remember warming temperatures can also loosen up the rime on rocks causing ice to plummet from above.

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March 10, 2017 at 6:07 am

Continued warming temperatures and poor overnight refreeze has lead to an increasing chance of loose-wet avalanches today. The avalanche danger could rise to MODERATE as loose wet avalanches become possible. Long, steep slopes such as on Mt Shasta provide the potential for loose wet avalanches to gain significant size. These avalanches could host enough snow to bury a person. If you observe loose wet instabilities, move to a shadier or lower angle slope.

 

 

 

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March 9, 2017 at 6:26 am

LOW avalanche danger exists at all elevations and normal caution is advised today. Ski and ride one at a time in avalanche terrain and don't group up in avalanche run out zones. LOW avalanche danger is not your cue to throw caution to the wind. LOW danger means that avalanches are unlikely, but not impossible. Always use safe travel practices.

 

 

 

 

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March 8, 2017 at 6:41 am

Above treeline today, the avalanche danger is CONSIDERABLE for new and existing wind slabs. Evaluate terrain and conditions carefully. Pay special attention as you approach above treeline terrain where the wind slab problem remains. Near treeline and below treeline, MODERATE avalanche danger will prevail. 

 

 

 

 

 

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