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Archived Avalanche Advisories from the Mount Shasta Avalanche Center

Use this page to view archived advisories. The table below shows the overall danger rating and the bottom line for the 20 most recent advisories. Click on the time and date link above each danger rating icon to view the full advisory for that day. Use the date chooser or the pager at the bottom to scroll through the older advisories.

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Date the advisory was published: Bottom Line
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December 20, 2013 at 7:22 am

Season's Greetings and Happy Holidays!

The Mt Shasta Avalanche Center, while eagerly waiting for snow, is busy planning for a great season.

Winter officially begins tomorrow and snow will start falling then, right?

The rockfall danger is currently rated at moderate to considerable. wink

Stay tuned for always the latest.

Click here to see the full advisory for
December 15, 2013 at 7:18 am

The tree is up, the lights are strung,
Are we having any fun?
Skis are sharpened, bases waxed,
But most are feeling mentally taxed.
Thinking, dreaming, dancing...
Praying for blessed snow to come,
So we can begin to shred our favorite run.
Skis, snowboard, snowmobile, snowshoe,
All have toys of choice...
So lets get together and do a dance for snow rejoice!


The Mt Shasta Avalanche Center, while eagerly waiting for snow, is busy planning for a great season. Stay tuned for always the latest.

Click here to see the full advisory for
December 14, 2013 at 7:07 am

The tree is up, the lights are strung,
Are we having any fun?
Skis are sharpened, bases waxed,
But most are feeling mentally taxed.
Thinking, dreaming, dancing...
Praying for blessed snow to come,
So we can begin to shred our favorite run.
Skis, snowboard, snowmobile, snowshoe,
All have toys of choice...
So lets get together and do a dance for snow rejoice!

Click here to see the full advisory for
December 13, 2013 at 7:11 am

If we are going to play by the "books", Winter officially begins on December 21st at 12:11pm EST... That being said, I suppose we can't complain that we have a 0-7 inch, salt and pepper snow pack currently.


Snow sports are on hold. If any skiing is possible, it would be on a select few of Mt Shasta's glaciers and the avalanche danger is low...very low. Hardly worth mentioning and only for the mentally, and physically toughest of souls!  


Waiting for snow!

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December 8, 2013 at 6:59 am

Three to seven inches of snow covers the slopes of our forecast area. We currently are patiently... I mean chomping at the bit, for more snow to fall. It will take likely 12 inches or more of snow to allow for snow sports to commence!

The only skiing and chance of avalanche danger will be on Mt. Shasta's glaciers. This danger remains low and it's likely that most of the cold, light density snow has blow away from the upper elevation winds we've received.

 

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December 7, 2013 at 7:19 am

The Mt Shasta area has received 3-7 inches of new, light density snow in the last 24 hours. This is our first real snow of the season and snow depth totals are not deep enough to warrant an avalanche.

Winds have been west to northwest over the past few days. One will see slightly greater snow depth totals on leeward, southerly aspects on Mt. Shasta. Winds were not as strong in the western portion of the forecast area.

 

 

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December 6, 2013 at 7:26 am

Greetings to all and Happy Holidays. This advisory commences the opening of the Mt. Shasta Avalanche Center for the 2013/14 season. We hope you all had a great Spring, Summer and Fall. Currently, we have a trace of snow on the ground above 7,000 feet on Mt. Shasta and Mt. Eddy. 

However, snow sports are on hold for now as is any avalanche danger. As we begin to receive snow, always be cautious of shallow burried objects such as rocks and fallen trees, etc. Stay fixed to our site for up to date avalanche danger, weather, events and photos!

In the mean time:
Check out our Events section for upcoming events.
Obtain your yearly Membership as well - your direct contributions help keep the machine running!
Click here to see the full advisory for
November 21, 2013 at 20:20 pm

The Mt Shasta Avalanche Center issued its last advisory of the 2012/13 season on April 7th, 2013. We will start issuing intermittent advisories if conditions warrant. We should start our regular advisories in early December.

In the mean time:
Check out our Events section for upcoming events.
Obtain your yearly Membership as well - your direct contributions help keep the machine running!
Click here to see the full advisory for
April 12, 2013 at 8:36 am

The Mt Shasta Avalanche Center issued its last advisory as of April 7th, 2013. Spring time brings us the possibility of corn snow, powder or rain. Remember it is possible for spring storms to dump impressive amounts of snow and rain. Most of the avalanche activity associated with these spring storms occurs during or shortly after the storm event. Timing is critical when playing in avalanche terrain.

The Five Red Flags of Avalanche Danger any time of year include: 1) Recent/current avalanche activity 2)Whumpfing sounds or shooting cracks 3) Recent/current heavy snowfall 4) Strong winds transporting snow 5) Rapid warming or rain on snow.

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April 6, 2013 at 6:44 am

A low chance of human triggered wind slabs exists today. Very isolated wind slabs will exist near and above treeline. Mid-elevation, S, SE, E, NE aspects and complex/extreme terrain will be the best place to find these slabs. Periods of recent snowfall with moderate to high west winds on the mountain have created these slabs. On the upper mountain, it's likely most of the snow has blown away and the snowpack has been scoured down to firm, icy snow. Slabs could be 6-12 inches deep.Cooling temperatures and increased cloud cover has decreased the chance of any loose-wet avalanches today . Further cooling will occur for the rest of the weekend and will help refreeze our current snowpack. Any warming related instabilities will be limited to roller balls, pin wheels and small, isolated point releases. If and when temperatures do begin to warm in the future, loose-wet instabilities will become a concern again.

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April 5, 2013 at 6:37 am

Loose-wet snow avalanches will be one's main concern for today and this weekend. Recent warm temperatures and rain on snow could allow for more loose-wet snow instabilities in the form of roller balls, point releases and potentially larger wet snow sloughs. Slopes steeper than 35 degrees from 6,000 to 11,500 feet, all aspects, will be most prone to these instabilities.

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March 31, 2013 at 6:54 am

The avalanche danger today is low with pockets of moderate.Timing of the storm this weekend has been slowed, however significant precipitation in the form of rain and snow is expected. Elevations below 8,000 feet will see mostly rain and/or wet snow. On the upper mountain, one or more feet of new snow is possible. Any instability due to rain will likely be seen within the first few hours of precipitation and/or during the warmest portions of the day. Storm slabs and wind slabs will be most sensitive to trigger today and tomorrow as new snow accumulates on the upper mountain.  Tuesday and Wednesday, temperatures are expected to be 10F degrees above normal. Wet-loose activity will still be our primary concern. Wind/Storm slabs could also linger on the upper mountain in isolated areas. Climbers be aware and carry a beacon, shovel and probe!

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March 30, 2013 at 6:51 am

The avalanche danger today is low for all aspects and elevations. We currently sit in the calm before the storm... Significant precipitation in the form of rain and snow will develop over the forecast area later today, tonight and Sunday. Elevations below 10,000 feet will see mostly rain on snow. On the upper mountain, one to two feet of new snow is possible. Avalanche conditions are currently low this morning but are expected to rise as the storm moves through. Any instability due to rain will likely be seen within the first few hours of precip. Storm slab and wind slabs will be most suspect on Sunday. Climbers should use extra caution this weekend and be sure to carry a beacon, shovel and probe!

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March 29, 2013 at 6:46 am

The avalanche danger today is low for all aspects and elevations. The forecast area has received 1" - 4" of wet snow (.28" water) at elevations above 6,500 feet in the past 48 hours with little wind. Temperatures today will be warm with a high near 50 F near treeline. A chance of scattered rain showers is possilbe in the afternoon. Conditions are WET and are going to continue to be wet through the weekend.  A storm will let loose over the area on Saturday and Sunday bringing significant precipitation. We could see up to .5" of rain and snow levels at 7,500 to 10,000 feet. Loose-Wet Avalanches are going to be the main concern for the next few days and the avalanche danger will likely rise as this storm develops on Saturday.

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March 24, 2013 at 6:25 am

The avalanche danger today is low for all aspects and elevations. This past Tuesday and Wednesday we had a warm storm drop about 4"-8" inches of snow to elevations above 6,500 ft and rain below. Following that, northwest winds howled stripping most if not all of the available new snow away. Conditions are firm and stable over the forecast area though there could be areas of small wind slabs snow in isolated areas near rock outcrops, chutes, gullies and wind eddies. Remember that low avalanche danger means that avalanches are still possible! Normal caution advised.

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March 23, 2013 at 6:18 am

The avalanche danger for today is low for all aspects and elevations. This past week we received a warm storm that brought 4"-8" inches of snow to elevations above 6,500 ft and rain below that. Yesterday, northwest winds howled on the mountain for the majority of the day and any snow available for transport probably got blown away! The main concern for today will be areas of wind deposited snow in isolated areas near rock outcrops, chutes, gullies and wind eddies. Wind slabs will be small, hard to find and likely of no consequence if triggered. Remember that low avalanche danger means that avalanches are still possible!

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March 22, 2013 at 7:09 am

The avalanche danger for today is low for all aspects and elevations. This past week we received a warm storm that brought 4"-8" inches of snow to elevations above 6,500 ft. Snow levels fluctuated and most of the snowpack below 6,500 feet took a hit from rain on snow. Overall, the recent storm snow was wet and deposited itself in a very cohesive manner on the mountain. The North winds blew yesterday on the upper mountain at a steady 20-30 mph with gusts higher. This morning, winds out of the north have increased and currently Gray Butte is showing average wind speeds of 40-50 mph with gusts to 78 mph. Most of the new snow is well pasted on the old snowpack or has simply blown away. That being said, one's primary concern for today should be for freshly formed wind slabs in isolated areas, below and above treeline, all aspects.

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March 17, 2013 at 6:38 am

The avalanche danger for today is low for all aspects and elevations. Our current snowpack sits in a state of transition from the varying temperatures over the past week. Cooler days recently have decreased the chance of the loose-wet avalanche potential. Small wind slabs are isolated to the mid and upper elevations of the mountain and will be difficult to trigger. A few cornices in the Castle Lake area along Middle Peak are present and could become weak during the warm portions of the day. While conditions are overall stable, low avalanche danger means avalanches are still possible.

 

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March 16, 2013 at 6:44 am

The avalanche danger for today is low for all aspects and elevations. We've seen a general cooling trend over the last two days and temperatures will remain similar to yesterday. All aspects below 8,000 feet will host soft, sticky snow with a low potential for loose-wet sloughs. Snow on slopes near and above treeline is making a transition to melt/freeze corn...supportable, however not fully mature... Mid elevation wet-loose activity has been low. Upper elevations will host wind packed powder and some small wind slabs in isolated areas with low potential to trigger.

 

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March 15, 2013 at 6:55 am

Warm temperatures during the day and above freezing lows at night has kept the new snow we received last week very soft with the potential of wet, loose avalanche activity today. Slopes that are southerly facing and steeper than 35 degrees will be most prone to wet, loose instability during the warmest portions of the day. Temperatures today will be slightly cooler than yesterday and thus any instability will likely be limited to the Castle Lake area and elevations below 7,000 feet.

 

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